Sep 1.jpg

1968 Childrens Savings

1968 Bankers Card

1968 Investment Services

1968 Personal Loans

1968 Safe Custody

WELCOME

SITE MENU

BRANCHES

COMMENT

CONTACT US

LEWIS’S BANK

 

 

http://www.martinsbank.co.uk/TOCFrame_files/image041.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg

WELCOME to January at Martins Bank Archive, and to MARTINS BANK MAGAZINE – our news feature in honour of the Bank’s staff publication, which from 1946 to 1969 brought news of changing times, new Branches and  services and even new technologies to Staff in England Wales, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man…  As we enter another year which will be tinged with the sadness of branch closures, we would like to thank our loyal and ever increasing band of visitors and contributors.

Sep 1.jpg

SPRING/SUMMER 2016

Sep 1.jpg

AUTUMN/WINTER 2016

Sep 1.jpg

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Sep 1.jpg

AUTUMN/WINTER 2017

Don’t forget our sister site - Lewis’s Bank Archive - which tells the story of Britain’s department store bank for the nine years that it was a subsidiary of Martins. You can click on the link at the top of this page for more info. The latest news stories are shown below, and you can catch up on some previous stories in-depth by downloading our half-yearly NEWSLETTERS.

Sep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg

Attention Martins and Barclays Pensioners!

Following recent long and confusing articles in the press about the future of the Barclays UK Retirement Fund, your attention is drawn to an important statement from the Secretary of the Grasshopper Pensioners’ Club on our GRASSHOPPER CLUB NOTICEBOARD . There you will find important documents related to this matter, along with a reminder that your own comments and views will only be accepted by the bank before close of business on Friday 26 January.

Sep 1.jpg

Oxfam Shop Find…

Sep 1.jpg

Images of Branches of Martins Bank “in action” are fairly rare – most of the images originally taken by the Bank itself were for the purposes of Head Office and its various departments including Premises Department who could use them to plan the future expansion of the bank. When a photograph surfaces showing staff going about their duties, it adds so much more to the historical value of such an image. We were more than delighted to have been contacted by Helena Cowell, who found the following wonderful image of Manchester City Office Branch, 43 Spring Gardens, enlarged and framed and for sale in her local Oxfam shop.

Sep 1.jpg

Images © Martins Bank Archive Collection – Helena Cowell

Sep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg

Helena provided us with very high quality scans of the photo, from which it will be possible for us to zoom in on the faces of the staff and on to the items they were using on the counter back then.  Back then being circa 1964, we think.  Faces and names will be added in due course to the relevant staff galleries here on the Web Site. We have also asked visitors to our Facebook Page for help naming the staff – even though some of them are standing near to cashier nameplates, theyc ould easily be standing at a different till, perhaps even checking the cash in eachother’s tills.  What a find!

Sep 1.jpgSep 1.jpg

 

 

Is it a Bank, a Farm or a Zoo?

For us, Martins Bank’s final major advertising campaign is a triumph and also perhaps its most memorable. Completely nutty, and VERY off the wall, the campaign ensures that the Bank goes out with a bang, rather than a whimper – or a whinny, or a moo, or a cluck, a bark, a trumpet… Hang on – just what IS this all about?  Well, first there was Caroline, the little girl whose pet elephant Rufus was welcomed into her local branch of Martins.  When she (and her advertising world “parents”) went on holiday, the Bank raised not a single eyebrow that the family’s pet Camel accompanied them when it was time to buy those all important travellers’ cheques and foreign currency.  Then there were those inseparable friends the young businessman and Arnold the Sea Lion. Not to mention the trendy young businesswoman whose pet wallaby Percy, carries the takings into the Bank to be paid in.  Lifelong partners, the worried looking man and his girlfriend Penelope the Hippopotamus receive good advice about Executor and Trustee services, and the young student opens his account in the company of his Zebra, Socrates.  Then there is the Martins Manager who is SO friendly and understanding to farming customers, he consults chickens when reviewing lending decisions, greets business customers at the counter assisted by a couple of cows, and even get his hands dirty trying out ploughing with shire horses at the local farm. In the same series of ads, the Manager also climbs a ladder with a hod of bricks, digs a large trench with a shovel whilst still dressed in his work clothes and bowler, and meets overseas customers paying strict attention to their beliefs and traditions.  Way ahead of its time, this is the kind of advertising that would be popular today, especially as unlike during the 1960s, Banks can advertise on television.  We have now collected just about every one of these very special advertisements, some from the Martins Bank Archive Collection, some from our friends at Barclays, and others recovered with the help of our friends at the British Newspaper Archive.  We already have the recollections of Caroline Griffiths, who was the little girl featured with the Elephant AND the Camel, but we’d love to know more about the other people involved in the creation of these little masterpieces.  A mock Martins Branch was constructed by the Advertising Company in a studio on the Finchley Road in London – were you in one of the images? Were you behind the camera, or was it your idea to unleash an entire world of animals on the unsuspecting customers of Martins Bank? Please do get in touch with us at the usual address – gutinfo@btinternet.com – and in the meantime here once again are some of the iconic advertisements…

Sep 1.jpg

20

Bank in a box?

Sep 1.jpg

This strange looking box is an exciting find for the Archive, providing as it does a glimpse back to 1930 and the earliest moments of the modern day Martins Bank Limited. Intended to be taken apart and moved to represent the Bank at different events and shows around the country, this “Pavillion” was designed by Architect Herbert J Rowse, (who designed the Bank’s Head Office). It was built for the Bank as a trade stand for the 1930 Royal Agricultural Show, held in Manchester,

Sep 1.jpg

Our thanks go to Architect Reg Towner, whose flickr.com page reflects his deep affection for all things Liverpool.  Reg explained to us that he came across the images in a thesis written by a student in the 1980s.  They were published in “The Book of the Liverpool School of Architecture” by Liverpool University Press in 1932.  You can see many more examples of the elaborate settings created for shows, fairs and events attended by the Bank between 1928 and 1969, on our TRADE STANDS page. 

See also our new feature OUT AND ABOUT – ON THE ROAD WITH MARTINS BANK, which offers example lists of the sheer number of events Martins visited in the years 1956 and 1969. The stand shown here (left) is a much less grand affair and was used in the 1950s and 60s mainly at indoor events, and for specific attendance at university Freshers fairs. Don’t forget that Martins also had a fleet of six Mobile Branch Caravans, you can read more about that by clicking HERE.

 

Sep 1.jpg

A temporary affair…

Sep 1.jpg

Although by the time of the merger with Barclays in 1969, Martins was operating around 730 Branches, our Archive holds details of nearly 1000 addresses that were used as Branches of Martins Bank between 1928 and 1969. The difference is made up by temporary branches, and those that were closed in the four decades before the merger.  It is the temporary branches that interest us in particular, as some are occupied for only a few short months before the business is moved to a permanent location. For a significant number, the move was delayed and what were meant to be basic stop-gap premises became full offices of the Bank for many more years than originally intended.  For the vast majority of Branches, we are lucky enough to have exterior and/or interior photographs, either from the Barclays collection, or from around twenty private collections. Sadly a significant number of the smaller Branches and sub Branches cannot be remembered and enjoyed by pictorial evidence, and for these outlets we turn to a number of sources of written information – this includes the BT Telephone Directories, historic town and city directories, and the British Newspaper Archive, which supports the work we do by allowing us to display newspaper advertising.  Some of this advertising includes precious information about when Branches of Martins Bank and its predecessors were opened, closed or moved.  In the example shown here, within one announcement we have written confirmation of the existence of TWO Birmingham Branches for which we otherwise had little information to go on.  The announcement was published in the Birmingham Daily Gazette on 31 October 1936. As well as providing detailed information about what would become known as Birmingham Markets Branch in Jamaica Row, the advertisement also reminds readers of the existence of the main Branch at 98 Colmore Row, and a short lived sub-Branch at Tyseley (May 1936 to Sep 1939).

Sep 1.jpg

… and a slightly more permanent one!

Sep 1.jpg

Our friends at the British Newspaper Archive are constantly adding more pages from local newspapers going back to the 1700s, and they are now part of the “Find My Past” group of companies, which provide invaluable information from many sources to encourage and allow research into our social history. The latest find is a collection of advertisements from the 1960s, each of which announces a new branch of Martins Bank. These are optimistic times, and the merger with Barclays is still some way off below the horizon. We have recovered and remastered a number of ads for Branches opening in Birmingham and Midland District of the bank, and some of them are shown below…

Sep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg 

There are more to be found, and we are currently updating our offline records with copies of adverts, and as  time allows, we will display as many of them as we can here within the Online Archive.

Sep 1.jpg

More Branches Found…

Sep 1.jpg

 Northampton Mercury and Herald 14 July 1939

Image © Northcliffe Media Limited Image created courtesy

of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. Image reproduced with kind 

permission of The British Newspaper Archive

 

We have recently added three Branches to our Branch Network pages.  Each represents an original building from which Martins relocated, either to a permanent site, because the original was too small or no longer viable where it was.  At Northampton, Martins opened its first Branch at 17 WOOD STREET, before moving two years later to 18 the Drapery, still open today. The original sub-Branch at Fulwell Sunderland, had the quite fabulous address of 16½ SEA ROAD (moving to 52 Sea Road in 1963)!  At Sheffield, the original Branch of the Equitable Bank at LEOPOLD STREET was used until 1930, when Martins moved into Telephone Buildings, West Street.  It will probably not be possible to find images of the original buildings, but as you will see from the article below about London’s Oxford Circus Branch, we never say never about these things! A fourth “branch” has also been identified, this time at Burnley.  At the end of World War 2, the Bank advertises in the local paper to let customers of 111 Colne Road sub-Branch know that a temporary office at 74 Colne Road will take its place for a few weeks.

Sep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg

London’s Crossrail® “uncovers”

Oxford Circus Branch!

Sep 1.jpg

We are by now used to finding information and images relating to Martins Bank’s Branches and Staff in many and varied locations, but it was a recent episode of BBC2’s “The Fifteen Billion Pound Railway” that led directly to some images of Oxford Circus Branch being recovered and added to our Archive.  This is the first time that pictures of the Branch have been seen since the merger with Barclays in 1969.  In order to compare the mammoth task of building Crossrail in the Twenty-First Century, the TV programme used clips from the records of British Transport Films, who documented the building of the Underground Victoria Line in the early 1960s. It was all beautifully shot on expensive colour film, and it unwittingly provided a wonderful social record of the time, showing thousands of ordinary Londoners going about their daily work routines.  With the help of our friends at BFI NATIONAL ARCHIVE, who own the rights to these particular British Transports Films, we were able to uncover two views of Martins Bank 251 Regent Street – Oxford Circus Branch – as it looked during the weekend of the August Bank Holiday 1963.  Both images, - and this close-up – can be seen on our OXFORD CIRCUS BRANCH PAGE. The BFI Film Forever Project has done some amazing work over the last five years or so, preserving Britain’s filmed history for future generations, AND making much of it available to view, buy and own.  You can visit their site, learn about their events and how to become a member of the BFI, by clicking HERE.

From “The Victoria Line Report Number 2 – Down and Along”

British Transport Films, August 1963 Images © BFI National ArchiveSep 1.jpg

 

Buyer Beware….

We have left the following article here once again for reference, to help explain the position regarding the theft of copyrighted images for the purposes of re-sale. There is a common misconception that if you can Google an image, then it is “in the public domain” and you can do what you want with it. Even some staff at eBay® believed this until they were recently put right – if you take or copy someone else’s work or property without their permission or acknowledgement, and sell it on to make even a penny out of it, this is breach of copyright, and the real owner can take legal recourse to stop further theft and misuse of their property. There are currently on eBay® a number of listings for photographs, showing scenes from the past and old buildings including these four Branches of Martins Bank. These images originated on our web site. As you can see, under our agreement with the owner, we prominently display copyright. These images have been copied and printed onto cheap photographic paper. The seller even has the gall to add their own watermark to the displayed images to prevent others from stealing them!!!

Sep 1.jpg

STAINLAND

Image © Barclays

SITTINGBOURNE

Image created by Martins Bank Archive and © Barclays

BURTON UPON TRENT

Image © Barclays

WALLASEY

Image © Barclays

Sep 1.jpg

As well as being against copyright law, these items are worthless, having little more than sentimental value – you will often find that collections and archives will make images available free of charge for private use, but you MUST check with them first. You should always check the seller’s right to copy the image – reputable sites such as eBay® do allow you to report copyright infringement. For ANY item of memorabilia, the best thing to do is shop around and compare prices – in the case of Martins Bank there are often up to twenty different items for sale on eBay® alone on any given day. For printed material which looks as if it has been copied, or actually claims to be a copy, ALWAYS question the seller about copyright.

Sep 1.jpgSep 1.jpg

Sep 1.jpg

Best Regards, Jonathan.

Westmorland, Monday 1ST January 2018

Sep 1.jpg

WHILST MARTINS BANK ARCHIVE HAS NO CONNECTION WITH THE DAY TO DAY TRADING ACTIVITIES OF THE

BARCLAYS GROUP OF COMPANIES, WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR THE CONTINUED GENEROUS GUIDANCE, ADVICE

AND SUPPORT OF BARCLAYS GROUP ARCHIVES IN THE BUILDING AND SHAPING OF THIS ONLINE SOCIAL HISTORY.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Sep 1.jpg                                                                                                                                             

Supported By

Sep 1.jpg

Gutinfo.jpgR

Sep 1.jpg