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1968 Childrens Savings

1968 Bankers Card

1968 Investment Services

1968 Personal Loans

1968 Safe Custody

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WELCOME to March at Martins Bank Archive, and to MARTINS BANK MAGAZINE – our news feature in honour

of the Bank’s staff publication, which from 1946 to 1969 brought news of changing times, new Branches and

services and even new technologies to Staff in England Wales, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man…

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Annual Report and Accounts

We have removed the page “Annual Report and Accounts for 1959, in favour of linking directly to BARCLAYS GROUP ARCHIVES, whose own web pages contain downloadable PDFs of the Annual Report and Accounts of the Bank from the days of the Bank of Liverpool and Martins in 1919 right up to 1968.

Who’s in the picture?

Here’s a request for some detective work – this original 1949 photograph (below) has found its way to us, and depicts a large number of the male staff of Blackpool, Clifton Street Branch along with one of the female staff.  Along with accalimed cameraman Bill robson, Marsh of Hoylake were engaged by the Bank to photograph Branches, staff and events all over the country, from the 1940s to the merger with Barclays in 1969.  This photo is reproduced in the Winter 1949 edition of Martins Bank Magazine, but the names of the individuals featured are not published. (It was only in the mid 1950s that the Magazine began to offer such detail!) usually only the Manager was named and his position in the photo given.  If one of this bunch rings a bell with you, and it turns out to be your uncle, father or grandfather, we’d love to hear from you at the usual address – gutinfo@btinternet.com  Some names have been identified already and are displayed on the photo.  The full front row has now been identified thanks to former Martins Blackpool Staff Member Mike Brown sho spotted Mr C W Aked, Clerk in Charge of Bispham sub-Branch. Mr Aked served the bank for an amazing FORTY-SEVEN years!

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Image © Martins Bank Archive Collection – Marsh of Hoylake and Successors 1949 to date

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10.

Byker Trove…

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Another previously missing piece of the jigsaw has turned up, in the form of this beautifully atmospheric photograph of Martins’ NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE BYKER BRANCH. Taken in 1962, it is part of the amazing Ward Philipson Photo Memories Collection, a major historical resource which contains thousands of images of the North of England from the earliest days of photography through to the 1960s, and contemporary times.  We were particularly delighted to be offered a copy of this photograph by John A Moreels MBE, as there was until now no external view of Byker Branch in our Archive.  It is now stored alongside several interior photos of Byker from the Barclays collection of Martins Bank Branch Photographs.  As well as showing the 1962 image in all its glory, our Byker page also shows two contemporary views of Byker Branch, taken for us in April 2016 by Steve Ellwood.  Time has not been kind to this lovely building, as you will see in our “then and now” comparison. The Photo Memories Collection is brought to life not only by their fascinating web site, but also through the hundreds of lectures and lantern slide illustrated talks its volunteer staff provides to interested groups. You can find out more about these, and view the collection so far digitised, by visiting the site HERE .

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Branch image  © Ward Philipson Photo Memories

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10.Disability Documented

Attitudes towards people at work who have disabilities, have changed radically for the better in recent decades, with a great deal of legislation and a great effort to work towards equality for employees and for everyone to realise and respect disability.  Barclays Group Archives and Martins Bank Archive are interested in documenting the experiences of disabled colleagues who worked at Martins and Barclays from the 1950s and earlier, up to the late 1990s. Until very recently, this is something that does not appear in the official written records, and we are keen to plug the gap with personal testimony.  Did you have a disability yourself, or did you work with someone who did?  We would be interested in hearing from you about your experience – how were people with disabilities treated, and did either Bank make any adjustments to help?  We are hoping to create a record of how disability was provided for, set against what is available today. If you would like to get involved please contact us at grouparchives@barclays.com (Maria) or gutinfo@btinternet.com  (Jonathan)

Painting the Forth Bridge again…

The annual overhaul of our 1200 pages is well underway, and this year we are adapting the 980+ BRANCH PAGES to the same width as our feature pages and sections. So far Branches in the range A to L have been converted, this includes Leeds Liverpool and London, along with the Channel islands and Isle of Man Branches. Many pages have re-written text, some have new articles and photographs, and there are a number of new contemporary images of Branches.

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The exercise should be complete by Spring 2017, so it won’t be long before that “annoying” blank space to the right of the page will have disappeared for good…

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A landmark year for a landmark

2017 sees the eighty-fifth anniversary of the opening of Martins Bank’s Head Office at 4 Water Street Liverpool. Whilst this iconic structure is no longer a bank, it is still being appreciated by audiences who see it featured in everything from blockbuster films to TV dramas.

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The latest of these was Stephen Poliakoff’s “Close to the Enemy” BBC2, November-December 2016. During 2017 we would like to feature memories of staff and customers, both of Martins Bank and Barclays Bank, for whom this building has a special place in their lives.  You can message our Facebook page, tweet @archivebank or email us at the usual address gutinfo@btinternet.com.

 

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On the detective trail

http://www.martinsbank.co.uk/Latest%20News%20-%20Martins%20Bank%20Archive_files/image016.jpg The staff of Martins Bank were not simply dedicated to working for what was affectionately known as “the family”. Many were talented in the fields of art, music and drama, and the annual exhibition at Head Office uncovered no end of staff members good at growing flowers and vegetables, taking prize-winning photographs, and writing either poetry or short stories. The Bank actively encouraged such diversity among its staff, and perhaps the most successful was Harold Blundell of Manchester District Office. In charge of the team of Bank Inspectors, by day Harold played an important role as Manchester Superintendent of Branches and later as Manager of Manchester City Office.

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However, when he was not ensuring due diligence amongst the Bank’s Staff, Harold Blundell became best-selling author George Bellairs, whose crime novels were ranked alongside those of Raymond Chandler. He wrote more than fifty books, many concentrating on the exploits of Inspector Littlejohn, but although very successful as a writer, he remained on the staff of Martins Bank until his retirement in 1962. Now, for the first time since the 1980s, some of Harold Blundell’s work is again to be in print - a re-run of three of his George Bellairs novels will be published under the British Library Crime Classics series. This will give a new audience the chance to become acquainted with the writing talents of this extraordinary member of Martins Bank’s Staff. We were contacted by Andy Wint, who has worked to make all this happen - Andy first came across Bellairs after taking part in a radio phone-in on the Isle of Man some twenty years ago, whilst discussing the Island's presence in the media he happened to mention that whilst Jersey had 'Bergerac' the Isle of Man didn't have an equivalent. After the programme had finished he was contacted by the nephew of Harold Blundell, George Bellairs sole direct relative. Andy was introduced to the enchanting world of Blundell/Bellairs' books and has subsequently worked to bring Bellairs to wider attention. He told us:

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“George Bellairs wrote over five dozen detective stories between 1941 and 1979, published by Foyle’s Thriller Book Club. They were well-written standard themes (murder, romance, money, principles, exigencies, prodigals etc.) featuring Inspector (later Superintendent) Littlejohn of Scotland Yard and his colleague Sergeant Cromwell. Many of them have an ecclesiastical tone. Littlejohn’s Isle of Man collaborator is The Venerable Archdeacon Caesar Kinrade. Several stories are set in and around the Isle of Man as well as other European locations and England’s North West. These well-told, carefully researched tales contain a wealth of characters which imbue the settings with warmth, strength and humanity. The books were published in English, also selling well in the US, and translated into French, German, Italian and Spanish. George Bellairs was a pseudonym for a Manchester banker cum Manx philanthropist named Harold Blundell. The books went out of print in the early 80s, Harold Blundell died in 1982. The titles to be once again made available in bookshops are Death of a Busybody, The Dead Shall be Raised and Murder of a Quack which will be published in the UK and Commonwealth by the British Library's Vintage Crime Series; the titles will also be on sale in the US, published by Poisoned Pen Press of Scottsdale, Arizona. Additionally they will be accessible as audio downloads in the UK and Commonwealth”.

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As Harold Blundell was both an INSPECTOR and a SUPERINTENDENT of Branches at Martins Bank, it is easy to appreciate how his hero Littlejohn was also endowed with those titles!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buyer Beware….

We have left the following article here once again for reference, to help explain the position regarding the theft of copyrighted images for the purposes of re-sale. There is a common misconception that if you can Google an image, then it is “in the public domain” and you can do what you want with it. Even some staff at eBay® believed this until they were recently put right – if you take or copy someone else’s work or property without their permission or acknowledgement, and sell it on to make even a penny out of it, this is breach of copyright, and the real owner can take legal recourse to stop further theft and misuse of their property. There are currently on eBay® a number of listings for photographs, showing scenes from the past and old buildings including these four branches of Martins Bank. These images originated on our web site. As you can see, under our agreement with the owner, we prominently display copyright. These images have been copied and printed onto cheap photographic paper. The seller even has the gall to add their own watermark to the displayed images to prevent others from stealing them!!!

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STAINLAND

Image © Barclays

SITTINGBOURNE

Image created by Martins Bank Archive and © Barclays

BURTON UPON TRENT

Image © Barclays

WALLASEY

Image © Barclays

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As well as being against copyright law, these items are worthless, having little more than sentimental value – you will often find that collections and archives will make images available free of charge for private use, but you MUST check with them first. You should always check the seller’s right to copy the image – reputable sites such as eBay® do allow you to report copyright infringement. For ANY item of memorabilia, the best thing to do is shop around and compare prices – in the case of Martins Bank there are often up to twenty different items for sale on eBay® alone on any given day. For printed material which looks as if it has been copied, or actually claims to be a copy, ALWAYS question the seller about copyright.

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Best Regards, Jonathan.

Westmorland, Wednesday 1ST March 2017

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WHILST MARTINS BANK ARCHIVE HAS NO CONNECTION WITH THE DAY TO DAY TRADING ACTIVITIES OF THE

BARCLAYS GROUP OF COMPANIES, WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR THE CONTINUED GENEROUS GUIDANCE, ADVICE

AND SUPPORT OF BARCLAYS GROUP ARCHIVES IN THE BUILDING AND SHAPING OF THIS ONLINE SOCIAL HISTORY.

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